Posts Tagged ‘geothermal equipment’

Process to change Geothermal from Heating to Cooling

Monday, June 7th, 2010
Jason Murphy

Jason Murphy

Geothermal systems provide both heating and cooling.

If you have a forced-air geothermal system using a water-to-air geothermal heat pump, simply change your thermostats from heating to cooling mode, and you are done. Forced-air geothermal systems are the easiest to change from heating to cooling mode.

Cooling with Hydronic Geothermal Heat Pumps

If you have a radiant heating system, your hydronic geothermal heat pump provides cooling via high-velocity or low-velocity air handlers.

Step 1: Locate your Hydronic Control Panel


If you have a hydronic system, the first step is to locate your hyrdonic control panel in the mechanical room.  You control panel will look like this:

Hydronic Control Panel

Hydronic Control Panel

Step 2: Determine if you have 1 or 2 Tekmar Controls


The device that tells your heat pump to make either hot or cold water is a Tekmar 152 two stage setpoint control.  Your control panel will either have one or two Tekmar controls.

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Geothermal Heat Pumps and Generator Sizing

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010
Dan Frawley

Dan Frawley

Geothermal heat pumps require more power during start up than while running.  In order to choose a backup generator, you need to calculate the starting wattage of the heat pump plus the running wattage of all other electrical components.

Be Aware of Locked Rotor Amperage

Many customers with geothermal systems also need backup generators due to remote locations or frequent power failures.  Locked Rotor Amperage refers to the current required to start the heat pump from rest, and is much larger than the current required for operation.  Unfortunately, you will need to purchase a larger backup generator.
Calculate Load / Select Generator

The most important piece of information you need to know is how much electrical power you will need for your specific situation because nothing will be as disappointing as purchasing an underpowered generator. You need to determine all the electrical devices you plan on running with the generator.

Most small electrical appliances run on 120 volts but there are larger appliances, such as a geothermal heat pump, that run on 240 volts.  It is important to note that if you need to run any 240volt devices you need to get a generator that is capable of 240-volt output.

The next step is determining the power requirement of your appliances in watts.  This can be fairly easy as most devices are described by their wattage; in the case of light bulbs the wattage is printed on the bulb itself.  If the device doesn’t provide a wattage requirement, you can determine watts by multiplying volts times amps.

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Geothermal Radiant Heating Systems

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010
Dan Frawley

Dan Frawley

Lessons Learned by Dan Frawley

Eagle Mountain is an alternative energy integrator. In plain and simple terms we are experts at combining multiple systems together. A prime example of this is pairing a geothermal heating system with radiant heat delivery. This type of system is something that we get inquiries about all the time.

Most people are under the impression that you cannot combine these two types of systems. They think that because a geothermal system is a low temperature heat source, radiant would not be a viable heat delivery method.

Those people would be wrong.

Geothermal heating with radiant is a great way to heat your home. You get all the benefits of radiant heat combined with all the benefits of Geothermal. The most common implementation of geothermal radiant heat systems is in a new build, but it is fairly common to have inquiries in regards to retrofits. Retrofitting geothermal with radiant poses its own set of issues and there are some common misconceptions that go along with that.

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Geothermal Tax Credit Explained

Monday, May 10th, 2010
Jason Murphy

Jason Murphy

A geothermal tax credit of 30% of the total system price is available for systems using qualified geothermal heat pumps.

In October 2008, geothermal heat pumps were added to section 25D of the Internal Revenue Code. This created a 30% federal geothermal tax credit for costs associated with qualified geothermal equipment “placed in service” through the end of 2016.

Equipment is usually considered to be placed into service when installation is complete and equipment is ready for use, or for new construction, when the owner takes residence.

Geothermal Tax Credit Overview

• 30% of total system cost
• No limit to credit amount for 2009 and beyond
• Can be used to offset AMT tax
• Can be used in more than one year
• Can be combined with solar and wind tax credits
• Can be combined with energy efficiency upgrade credits

What’s Eligible?

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